photography from the ground up

The Ways of Water

If there is magic on this earth it lies in water.

Loren Eisley

Water, without it life cannot exist. It is elusive, you cannot hold it long in your hand (unless it is in its frozen state and even then it soon melts away), yet it carves mile deep canyons through billion year old rock.

I made this first image on a cold day last week. I walked up the East Fork of the Jemez River at Battleship Rock looking for water and ice, and while there was plenty of both, it took a while before I found a composition worthy of an image. This small cascade was exactly what I had in mind; the ice suspended above the rushing water and coating the small branches has a fragile elegance that is all its own.

After leaving the East Fork, I walked a ways up the Rio San Antonio to this waterfall. It is a favorite of mine; I have been coming to this place for many years. I used to bring my daughters here on hikes when they were little girls, so I have a deep connection to it. Again, I was looking for ice, and again I found it. I don’t know how many photographs I’ve made of this waterfall over the years, but this is certainly one of my favorites.

I made this photograph of upper Guadalupe Falls, as well as the two that follow, in the mid-nineties with my Nikon F3 using Fuji Velvia transparency film. To achieve this intimate perspective, I had to set my tripod on a boulder which was lodged above the falls where they drop about ten feet. It is a precarious platform with not much room to work from, but the results seem worth the risk. The snow and ice on the rocks and the greenish color of the icy water give this image a frigid feel.

This is the same waterfall as in the second photograph. It is an abstract to some degree, but the reality of the falls is still obvious. I have always loved the visual and physical contrast between liquid water–particularly if it’s moving–and its solid state when it appears to be moving. Here the immutable basalt face of the cliff provides yet another contrast to the ephemeral nature of the water.

This is the lower end of Guadalupe Falls; the rock in this location is granite, part of an ancient upthrust. The shapes and the solid presence of the rock juxtaposed against the relentless flow of the river through this narrow passage along with the figurative connection between the two provided by the ice are the elements I was reacting to when I made this photograph.

 

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5 responses

  1. Prachtige foto’s van de waterpartijen

    Like

    February 16, 2022 at 2:24 am

  2. Sue

    Quite dramatic

    Like

    February 16, 2022 at 3:22 am

  3. Your opening image is really stunning Jim. I miss the beauty of ice and snow but am not willing to endure the cold that creates it LOL. Enjoyed the post that much more for having given in to living in the south.

    Like

    February 16, 2022 at 8:56 am

    • Thanks Tina. As spring approaches I start feeling a little ambivalent about the winter weather, but wait, it’s snowing again. I guess I can handle one more storm. 🙂

      Like

      February 17, 2022 at 7:00 am

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