photography from the ground up

Pueblo Bonito Re-visited

The first time I visited Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, I was overwhelmed by a sense of gratitude. I felt such a connection to the people who built this amazing place, and I silently thanked them for building it strong enough to withstand the ravages of time so I could stand in awe of their craftsmanship a thousand years later. This first image was made at the southeast corner of the pueblo.

Pueblo Bonito is the largest of a number of Greathouses in Chaco Canyon built by the ancestors of the present-day pueblo people of northern New Mexico. At the time it was built, the Anasazi’s territory covered a large area which spanned the entire Four Corners region. Chaco Canyon contained several pueblos, and is thought to have been a gathering place for religious ceremony and trading. Pueblo Bonito may have been used to house visitors as well as a large population of the local people. It was four to five stories high in some places, contained nearly eight hundred rooms, and was capable of accommodating  several thousand.

This is an image of one of the thirty seven kivas in Pueblo Bonito; two of them, the great kivas, were used for ceremony. The rest were used as gathering places, similar to our present-day family or living rooms. They were, for the most part, constructed underground –the word kiva means “world below”, and had roofs constructed of vigas, latillas, and mud. Access was by means of a ladder through an opening in the roof.

This image shows a section of the long, curving back wall of the complex. The builders who designed Pueblo Bonito used core and veneer architectural techniques, making the walls of the lower levels up to three feet thick.  These massive walls were capable of supporting more levels above as the structure grew in size over the centuries.

This last image was made from the top of the mesa behind the pueblo; it shows the entire complex, and the semi-circular design of the structure. The center wall divided the whole into two symmetrical halves, and was a design element in many of the pueblos of this era.

Sometime around 1150 CE, the ancient people began to migrate away from the area. Their sudden disappearance is attributed to several factors, including: climate change, topsoil degradation, and pressure from other cultures.¹

1. Wikipedia contributors. “Ancient Pueblo Peoples.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 9 Mar. 2011. Web. 10 Mar. 2011.

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6 responses

  1. I really like the top photo Jim, the colours, the dark sky, the composition, the wide-angle. It has a great sense of depth to it. Very nice.

    Like

    March 10, 2011 at 9:53 am

    • Jim

      Thanks Mike. I used a Nikon 17-35mm lens on this shot. Great optics help! 🙂

      Like

      March 10, 2011 at 10:16 am

  2. Great pictures, Jim! I love the blue/brown constrast.

    Like

    March 10, 2011 at 7:06 pm

    • Jim

      Thanks Sheryllrea. The unexpected colors in a desert landscape is one of the things I love about finding and photographing them.

      Like

      March 11, 2011 at 8:08 am

  3. Thank You. Wonderful pictures. Very serene.

    Like

    March 10, 2011 at 7:44 pm

  4. awesome pictures!

    Like

    March 10, 2011 at 9:47 pm

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